Open Access

Open access is a publication model where readers can use full texts of articles in any way for noncommercial purposes, so long as the articles are cited properly. Proper citation is easily understood and accomplished. This is permitted through a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license [1,2]. Open Access has significant advantages and has grown in many ways [3]. This is why International Drug Abuse Research Society (IDARS) and The International Narcotics Research Conference (INRC) selected Open Access as the journal mechanism for the society.

Many printed journals are limited in the number of pages they can print in a given time. This can unreasonably limit the number of articles that are accepted by the journal. Open Access does not have that problem since articles are electronically stored without any limitation. The article needs only to pass the threshold for acceptable science. Also, there is no subscription fee for the reader.

Importantly, Open Access offers the widest possible audience, including those in low-income countries, and the lowest barrier to the latest information. Anyone in any field, be it education, news, industry, science or whatever, can easily access the articles. Again, the information can be used in any way, provided the conditions for reproduction and using are met [1,2].

Another important finding is that data indicate an advantage in citation frequency for open access journals. It has been suggested [4] that there are many aspects to the advantages of open access. These are higher citation numbers [5], greater awareness of and reading by investigators in cross and related disciplines, and because of greater availability on search engines such as google, a greater access and use by nonscientific readers such as policymakers. IDARS, INRC and JDAR want to be on the cutting edge and serve its members and readers in the best possible way.

References

  1. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/, accessed on May 21, 2015.
  2. https://tldrlegal.com/license/creative-commons-attribution-noncommercial-%28cc-nc%29, accessed on May 21, 2015.
  3. H. Joseph, The open access movement grows up: taking stock of a revolution, PLoS Biol, 11 (2013), e1001686. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001686.
  4. G. Eysenbach, The open access advantage, J Med Internet Res, 8 (2006), e8. doi: 10.2196/jmir.8.2.e8.
  5. M. Norris, C. Oppenheim, and F. Rowland, The citation advantage of open-access articles, J Assoc Inf Sci Technol, 59 (2008), 1963--1972. doi: 10.1002/asi.20898.